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  Aug 30, 2014   |   Last update: August 4, 2014 @ 8:21 am

19th Annual Symposium – National Parks: Past, Present and Future

About the event:

Promo_19thSymposum

Stegner Center Nineteenth Annual Symposium
National Parks: Past, Present, and Future

Thursday and Friday, March 27 to 28, 2014
The City Library, Salt Lake City, Utah

The national park idea, the best idea we ever had, was inevitable as soon as Americans learned to confront the wild continent not with fear and cupidity but with delight, wonder, and awe. - Wallace Stegner

Register online or by phone at 801-585-3440 »

Download the 2014 Symposium brochure »

The Stegner Center’s nineteenth annual symposium will focus on the topic “National Parks: Past, Present, and Future.” It has been nearly a century since Congress passed the National Parks Organic Act of 1916, giving legal expression to the idea of a national park system and the National Park Service to oversee it. Much has happened since then; the system has grown to encompass more than 400 units that extend across all fifty states and cover more than 84 million acres. Roughly 280 million people visit our national parks annually, and the national park idea now reaches across the globe. Although much beloved, the national parks face significant challenges that include seasonal visitation pressures, incompatible recreational demands, intense political and economic pressures from adjoining communities, potentially destructive external development activities (including climate change), an aging and non-diverse visitor pool, and diminished financial support. And yet another issue is whether and how the system should grow in the future. The Stegner Center symposium aims to examine and to untangle these matters to ensure future generations continue to enjoy our remarkable national park system. 

Register online or by phone at 801-585-3440 »

Symposium Agenda

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at the College of Law

12:15 p.m.
Wallace Stegner Lecture
Past and Future Yellowstones: Finding Our Way in Wonderland

Paul Schullery, Author and Scholar-in-Residence, Montana State University Library 

Thursday, March 27, 2014 at The City Library

9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
Registration

9:30 – 9:40 a.m.
Welcome and Introductions

9:40  a.m.
National Parks and the Course of Modern American History
Mark Fiege, Colorado State University

10:15 a.m.
Understanding the Legal and Policy Framework
Robert Fischman, Indiana University

10:45 a.m.
Break: Refreshments in Conference Center

11:15 a.m.
Commerce, Community Welfare, and the Parks
Patricia Gude, Headwaters Economics

11:45 a.m.
Parks, Politics, and Partnerships
T. Destry Jarvis, Outdoor Recreation & Park Services

12:15 p.m.
Lunch on your own

1:45 p.m.
Interlude: The Bright Edge—Photographs and Stories from the National Parks
Stephen Trimble, Writer and Photographer  

2:15 p.m.
Science, Resource Stewardship, and the Parks
Gary Machlis, National Park Service

2:45 p.m.
Taking Science Seriously: An Outsider’s View
Jodi Hilty, Wildlife Conservation Society

3:15 p.m.
Break: Refreshments in Conference Center

3:45 p.m.
Park Visitation and Resource Management Challenges
Matthew Brownlee, University of Utah

4:15 – 5:00 p.m.
Keynote—The National Park Service at 100: Stewardship for a New Century
Jonathan Jarvis, Director, National Park Service

Friday, March 28, 2014  at The City Library

9:30 a.m.
Climate Change and Resource Management in the Parks
Healy Hamilton, NatureServe

10:00 a.m.
The Diversity Challenge: Bringing New Visitors to the Parks
Audrey Peterman, Earthwise Productions, Inc.

10:30 a.m.
Break: Refreshments in Conference Center

11:00 a.m.
New Audiences and New Programs: Health, Education, and Nutrition
Chris Spence, Institute at the Golden Gate

11:30 p.m.
Growing the System: New Designations and Urban Strategies
Denis Galvin, National Park Service (retired)

12:00 p.m.
Lunch on your own

1:30 p.m.
Growing the System: Landscape Conservation Strategies
Bob Keiter, University of Utah 

2:00-3:30 p.m.
The Utah National Parks: Challenges and Opportunities
Kate Cannon, Superintendent, Southeast Utah Group, National Park Service
Ashley Korenblat, CEO, Western Spirit Cycling; Managing Director, Public Lands Solutions 
David Nimkin, Senior Director, Southwest Region, National Parks Conservation Association
Vicki Varela, Managing Director, Utah Office of Tourism

 

Wednesday Speaker

Wallace Stegner Lecture
Past and Future Yellowstones: Finding Our Way in Wonderland
Paul Schullery

Paul Schullery began his conservation career in 1972 as a ranger-naturalist in Yellowstone National Park and has held several other positions in the park, including historian-archivist, chief of cultural resources, and senior editor in the Yellowstone Center for Resources. He is the author, co-author, or editor of more than 40 books, including Mountain Time (1984); Searching for Yellowstone (1997); Lewis and Clark Among the Grizzlies (2002); Myth and History in the Creation of Yellowstone National Park (with Lee Whittlesey, 2003); and This High, Wild Country (2010). 

For his work as a writer, historian, and conservationist, Paul has received honorary doctorates of letters from Montana State University (1997) and Ohio University (2013); the Wallace Stegner Award from the University of Colorado Center for the American West (1998); a Panda Award from Wildscreen International (2002) for his script for the ABC/PBS film “Yellowstone: America’s Sacred Wilderness”;  the Communications Leadership Award (2008) from the U.S. Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee for his “extraordinary work in grizzly bear recovery”; and the Communications Award from the George Wright Society (2011) for his “outstanding contributions to conservation history, national park policy, and the understanding of wildlife.”

Paul was as an advisor and interviewee for the Ken Burns film “The National Parks” (2009). He is currently Scholar-in-Residence at the Montana State University Library. Paul is married to the artist Marsha Karle, with whom he has collaborated as author and artist on seven books.

Thursday Speakers

National Parks and the Course of Modern American History

Mark Fiege is an environmental historian and the author of two books, Irrigated Eden: The Making of an Agricultural Landscape in the American West (1999), and, most recently, The Republic of Nature: An Environmental History of the United States (2012). His article “The Weedy West: Mobile Nature, Boundaries, and Common Space in the Montana Landscape,” published in the Western Historical Quarterly in 2005, received the Theodore Blegen prize from the Forest History Society. Upon completing his Ph.D. at the University of Utah in 1994, Fiege joined the faculty at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, where he is now a professor of history and a council member of the Public Lands History Center, which he co-founded in 2006. In collaboration with Dr. Ben Bobowski, chief of resource stewardship at Rocky Mountain National Park, Fiege is now working on a book tentatively titled Elegant Conservation: Management in a Time of Unprecedented Uncertainty.

Understanding the Legal and Policy Framework

Robert Fischman is a professor at both the law school and the school of public and environmental affairs at Indiana University—Bloomington. Before joining the Indiana faculty in 1992, he taught at the University of Wyoming College of Law and served as Natural Resources Program Director and Staff Attorney at the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C.  He has taught in the environmental law programs at both Vermont Law School and Lewis and Clark School of Law. Professor Fischman has also been a senior research scholar at Yale Law School.  His scholarship focuses on public land management, wildlife conservation, federalism, environmental impact analysis, adaptive management, and global climate change. Fischman’s books include The National Wildlife Refuges: Coordinating a Conservation System through Law and Federal Public Land & Resources Law.

Commerce, Community Welfare, and the Parks

Patricia Gude is a Research Analyst for Headwaters Economics, where she specializes in research on economics, land use, and land management.  She has published research findings on topics including the economic value of protected lands, the drivers of wildfire suppression costs, the impacts of energy specialization, and the effects of development patterns on wildlife populations and ecosystems.  She is an enthusiast of the scientific method and the use of empirical data and quantitative approaches to answer questions about community development and land management decisions in the West.  

Parks, Politics, and Partnerships

Destry Jarvis has spent the past 41 years working professionally in the parks, recreation, historic preservation, and youth service fields, in senior positions for non-profit associations, the US Department of the Interior, and as a for-profit consultant.  For the past eleven years, Mr. Jarvis has conducted high level consulting in policy and management of units of the national park system, cooperative land use planning at the local, state and federal levels, preservation of farmland and open spaces, public lands natural and cultural resources management, tourism marketing and policy, historic preservation, and recreation programs, carrying capacity determination, agri- and eco-tourism, appropriate development in public spaces, and concessions assessments.  Prior to his consulting business, Mr. Jarvis’ professional positions included Executive Director, National Recreation & Park Association; Vice President, National Association of Service and Conservation Corps; Assistant Director, U.S. National Park Service; Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior; Executive Vice President, Student Conservation Association; and Vice President, National Parks Conservation Association.

Interlude: The Bright Edge—Photographs and Stories from the National Parks

Stephen Trimble has received numerous awards for his photography, his non-fiction, and his fiction, including: The Sierra Club's Ansel Adams Award for photography and conservation; The National Cowboy Museum’s Western Heritage “Wrangler” Award; a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellowship at the University of Utah Tanner Humanities Center; and a Doctor of Humane Letters from his alma mater, Colorado College, honoring his efforts to increase our understanding of Western landscapes and peoples.  As writer, editor, and photographer, Trimble has published more than 20 books, including Bargaining for Eden: The Fight for the Last Open Spaces in America and Lasting Light: 125 Years of Grand Canyon Photography.  Trimble teaches writing in the University of Utah Honors College and makes his home in Salt Lake City and in the redrock country of Torrey, Utah. 

Science, Resource Stewardship, and the Parks

Gary Machlis is Science Advisor to the Director, National Park Service, and Professor of Environmental Sustainability at Clemson University. He is the first scientist appointed to this position with the NPS, and advises the director on a range of science policy issues and programs. Dr. Machlis has served as Interim Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Idaho, and been a visiting professor at Nanjing Technological College in China and at Yale University. Dr. Machlis received his bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Washington in Seattle, and his Ph.D. in human ecology from Yale. He has written numerous books and scientific papers on issues of conservation, including The State of the World’s Parks (1985), the first systematic study of threats to protected areas around the world. His most recent co-edited book is Warfare Ecology: A New Synthesis for Peace and Security (2011). His research has been published in journals as varied as Bioscience, Climatic Change, Conservation Biology, Society and Natural Resources, and Science. In 2010, Dr. Machlis was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

Taking Science Seriously: An Outsider’s View

Jodi Hilty is the Executive Director of the North America Program for the Wildlife Conservation Society. She provides leadership on the scientific applications utilized to address four major natural resource management and conservation issues across North America, including promoting healthy communities to sustain a healthy environment, identifying and protecting wildlife corridors allowing species room to roam, reducing the threats of natural resource extraction, and addressing the myriad of challenges climate change poses to wildlife and wild places. Overseeing a staff of 60 working in some of the most remote locations, Dr. Hilty promotes the active engagement of WCS in the larger scientific and conservation communities, strengthens partnerships with agencies and organizations, and cultivates the next generation of conservation science leaders. Trained as a conservation biologist at the University of California, Berkley, her passion is focused on finding creative, science-based solutions to resolve critical conflicts between humans and the natural world.

Park Visitation and Resource Management Challenges

Matthew Brownlee’s inter-disciplinary research links outdoor recreation and resource management, and provides information to help park and protected area managers plan for, monitor, and evaluate visitor experiences.  He uses visitor surveys (internet and on-site sampling methods), GPS tracking, infrared counters, and photographic methods to help managers evaluate visitors’ 1) on-site behaviors, motivations and benefits, 2) perceptions of environmental conditions, and 3) park crowding and carrying capacities. He also examines how nature-based recreationists’ interactions and attachments to climate-sensitive and impacted environments influence their 1) attitudes towards sustainability initiatives, 2) visitation and recreation behavior, and 3) opinions about global climate change. His research generally incorporates student learning and addresses a pertinent management need in addition to unanswered academic questions.

Keynote— The National Park Service at 100: Stewardship for a New Century

JarvisJonathan B. Jarvis began his career with the National Park Service in 1976 as a seasonal interpreter in Washington, D.C.   Today, as the Service’s 18th Director, he is responsible for more than 22,000 employees, a $3 billion budget, preservation, conservation and recreation programs that are helping to revitalize communities across America, as well as 401 national parks that attract more than 280 million visitors every year who generate $30 billion in economic benefit across the nation.  Managing the National Park Service on the eve of its 2016 centennial, Jarvis has focused on several key areas that are critical for the future: enhancing stewardship of the places entrusted to the Service’s care; maximizing the educational potential of parks and programs; engaging new generations and audiences, and ensuring the welfare and fulfillment of National Park Service employees.  Jarvis speaks frequently about climate change, sustainability, the outdoors as a source of public health, and the parks as a unifying, inspirational force for the nation. His blueprint for the agency’s second century, A Call to Action, calls for innovative, ambitious, yet practical ways to fulfill the National Park Service’s promise to America in the 21st century.

Friday Speakers

Climate Change and Resource Management in the Parks

Healy Hamilton is currently Chief Scientist at NatureServe. She is a biodiversity scientist with broad interests in the evolution and conservation of the diversity of life.  Her current research focus is global change biology, with an emphasis in forecasting the impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems for natural resource management and conservation.  Her most recent research efforts involve understanding uncertainty in ecological forecasting. She has published her work together with colleagues in NatureProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ecological Modeling, and other peer-reviewed journals. She serves on the board of the Society for Conservation GIS and the Science Committee of the National Park Service Advisory Board. She is a Switzer Foundation Environmental Leadership grantee and a former U.S. Fulbright Scholar. 

The Diversity Challenge: Bringing New Visitors to the Parks

Audrey Peterman is President and Co-founder of Earthwise Productions, Inc., an environmental consulting and publishing firm focused on connecting the public lands system and the racially diverse American public. She is co-author with her husband Frank of the book, “Legacy on the Land: A Black Couple Discovers Our National Inheritance and Tells Why Every American Should Care,” and the recently-released travel guide, “Our True Nature: Finding a Zest for Life in the National Park System!” She is the recipient of the 2013 “Apex Distinguished Service” Award from Black Meetings and Tourism Magazine; the “Environmental Hero Award” from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2000; the “Marjory Stoneman Douglas Outstanding Citizen Conservationist Award” from the National Parks Conservation Association, 1997, and the “George Barley Leadership Award” from the 40-member Everglades Coalition, 1999. 

New Audiences and New Programs: Health, Education, and Nutrition

Chris Spence brings 20 years' experience working internationally and in the United States on sustainable development, including conservation, climate change, health policy, and protected areas. Prior to joining the Institute at the Golden Gate in 2012, he served in senior management roles for nonprofits in New York, Europe, and New Zealand. He has also consulted for the United Nations and IUCN, the World Conservation Union. Spence is an award-winning writer who has been widely published and has been a guest speaker at many international events.

Growing the System: New Designations and Urban Strategies

Denis Galvin joined the National Park Service at Sequoia National Park in 1963 as a Civil Engineer, after serving in the first Peace Corps group in Tanganyika. In a 38-year career he served in parks, regional offices, training centers, and service centers and concluded his career with 16 years in the Washington office. For nine of those years he was Deputy Director, serving in the Reagan, Clinton and Bush administrations. As the highest ranking career official, he represented the National Park Service in over 200 Congressional hearings. In 1991, he was awarded the Pugsley medal for outstanding service to parks and conservation. In 2001, he was given the Presidential Rank Award for exceptional achievement in the career senior executive service. Since retiring in 2002, he has continued working in the conservation field. He served as a member of the Second Century Commission co-chaired by Senators Howard Baker and Bennett Johnson. He was a consultant on the Ken Burns’ film “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea.” In 2011, he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administrators. In 2013, he received the George Melendez Wright award for his “distinguished lifetime record...on behalf of America’s national parks.” Currently, he serves on the Board of the National Parks Conservation Association and is an Advisor to the Coalition of National Park Service retirees.    

Growing the System: Landscape Conservation Strategies

Bob Keiter is the Wallace Stegner Professor of Law, University Distinguished Professor, and founding Director of the Wallace Stegner Center for Land, Resources and the Environment at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. He has served on the boards of the National Parks Conservation Association, the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, the Sonoran Institute, and the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation. In 2008, the National Parks Conservation Association honored him with its National Parks Achievement Award. His books include To Conserve Unimpaired: The Evolution of the National Park Idea (2013); Keeping Faith with Nature: Ecosystems, Democracy, and America’s Public Lands (2003); Reclaiming the Native Home of Hope: Community, Ecology, and the West (1998); and The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem: Redefining America’s Wilderness Heritage (1991)

 The Utah National Parks: Challenges and Opportunities

Kate Cannon, Superintendent, Southeast Utah Group, National Park Service
Ashley Korenblat, CEO, Western Spirit Cycling; Managing Director, Public Lands Solutions 
David Nimkin, Senior Director, Southwest Region, National Parks Conservation Association
Vicki Varela, Managing Director, Utah Office of Tourism

 

Registration

Admission to the symposium requires registration and payment, which is due at the time of registration.  Although you can register at the door, advance registration is recommended, as the symposium may sell out in advance. The Wallace Stegner Lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

Register online or by phone at 801-585-3440 »

Registration Fees

$150 if received by March 2
$175 if received on March 3 or later

$125 Seniors and University Faculty & Staff, if received by March 2
$150 Seniors and University Faculty & Staff, if received on March 3 or later 

$50 Students, if received by March 2
$75 Students, if received on March 3 or later 

9 hours CLE Credits (pending)

 

Principal Funding

R. Harold Burton Foundation

Cultural Vision Fund

 

Sponsors

S.J. and Jessie E. Quinney Foundation

ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources

The Nature Conservancy in Utah

Natural Resources Law Forum

 SymposiumSponsorLogos

 

Locations

Wallace Stegner Lecture: 

University of Utah S. J. Quinney College of Law
Sutherland Moot Courtroom
332 South 1400 East
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112

Symposium:

The City Library
Main Library Auditorium 
210 East 400 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111

To request an ADA accommodation at the symposium, please contact: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Circle, #135, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, 801-581-8365.  Reasonable notice is required.