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S.J. Quinney College of Law

  Sep 1, 2014   |   Last update: August 4, 2014 @ 8:21 am

Downtown CLE: Arguing Before the U.S. Supreme Court on Behalf of Crime Victims

About the event:

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Recently, Professor Paul Cassell had the opportunity to argue before the U.S. Supreme Court in an important crime victims' rights case, United States v. Paroline.  Cassell and Reymann will talk about the legal issues in that case, which involves a claim for sizable restitution filed by "Amy," a victim of child pornography. They will also discuss how he prepared for the oral argument and how the Court closely questioned the lawyers on all sides of the case.

1 CLE credit (approval pending).

Registration Required for (free) CLE credit and/or lunch ($15) »

12:00-1:00 p.m., Parr Brown (185 S. State Street #800)

Speakers Include: David Reymann of Parr Brown and Professor Paul Cassell

ReymannDavid Reymannassists clients in a wide variety of complex commercial litigation matters. He has experience in a number of areas of the law, with particular expertise in First Amendment and media litigation, including open records laws, access to court proceedings, defamation, reporters’ privilege issues, and anti-SLAPP litigation. Mr. Reymann is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law and a periodic lecturer on constitutional law. He helps staff the Utah Freedom of Information Hotline at Parr Brown, which provides pro bono legal assistance to Utah journalists. He also performs pro bono work for the Media Law Resource Center, which focuses on legal issues facing the media in litigation. Mr. Reymann has represented numerous media organizations in Utah and several national organizations, including CNN and the Associated Press.

cassellPaul G. Cassell received a B.A. (1981) and a J.D. (1984) from Stanford University, where he graduated Order of the Coif and was President of the Stanford Law Review. He clerked for then-Judge Antonin Scalia when Scalia was on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (1984-85) and then for the Chief Justice of the United States, Warren Burger (1985-86). Cassell then served as an Associate Deputy Attorney General with the U.S. Justice Department (1986-88) and as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia (1988 to 1991). Cassell joined the faculty at the College of Law in 1992, where he taught full time until he was sworn in as a U.S. District Court Judge for the District of Utah on July 2, 2002. In November 2007, he resigned his judgeship to return full time to the College of Law, to teach, write, and litigate on issues relating to crime victims' rights and criminal justice reform. Professor Cassell teaches criminal procedure, crime victims' rights, criminal law, and related classes.

 For questions about this event contact Miriam Lovin (801-585-3479).